Tuesday, 11 August 2009

D is for...


Dead

When archeologists discovered the ancient site of Pompeï in the 19th century, they didn't really know what they had or how big it was. Over the years both became apparent while the archeologists uncovered more and more of the old Roman town. They did however stumble upon one slight mystery. Sometimes while digging, they found a void in the ground. One day, one of the men decided to pour liquid plaster in the void, wait for it to harden and then unearth it again.

What he found were outlines of people. Adults and children and on occasion even animals. Sometimes alone, sometimes in a small group, huddled together in fear of the great unknown. All died not knowing what had just happened, since nobody had ever seen a vulcano!

Over the years the process of plastering was abandoned as they found it did quite a lot of damage and wouldn't keep for eternity. New methods of preserving the unearthed are being looked into. However, the old method has done one thing: it gave Pompeï a human touch, it added feeling to a place of ruin, it gave the town a voice!

For more D-words, please check out ABC Wednesday and join in the fun!

PS: This is my first entry to my second round of ABC!!!

22 comments:

  1. What a fantastic post! And the shots are terrific! How wonderful it would have been to have been there to see these for real! Such a horrific example of nature's power!

    Thanks!
    Sylvia

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  2. I would say yours is the most original use of a D word. I never would have thought of Dead for mine. Good job and info.

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  3. I think it's fascinating that archeologists are still learning more about Pompei. This is a fascinating photo.

    I never knew they had poured plaster into the holes to find out what was there. Too bad it caused damage.

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  4. A fantastic post! Incredible photo... Thank you!

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  5. I've always found Pompeii fascinating. Great photos, and interesting to read about.

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  6. Great post Mara - I would love to visit Pompei - so interesting. A

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  7. Visited Pompei in june 2006 before my holiday in Puglia. Go there

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  8. Wow, how interesting! Great "D".

    Thanks for stopping by!

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  9. I had no idea. Thanks for the great information.

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  10. Those figures are just so evocative of their pain and fear. We can feel it all those centuries later. Someday I'll get to Pompeii.

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  11. Interesting choice of word and a very interesting presentation of it! I love the information you gave us. I don't always remember those things from my art history classes, so it is good to get the information again to help me retain such fascinating morsels.

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  12. I am amazed at how archeologists can read the past. The people of Pompei must have been so scared....
    you are right, these images do give a voice and the human touch...
    Amazing D...
    Sherry

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  13. That is amazing. I have to agree that yours is the most fascinating word for D.

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  14. Wow! What a great post. Awesome pic and a history/archaelogy lesson too!

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  15. Your picture is very poignant and the post is very interesting. Techniques in archaeology have improved over the years and I am sure that Pompei will continue to fascinate in the centuries ahead.

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  16. I remember being moved when I first saw pictures of the people and animals in Pompeii in history class at school. It really does bring home to you the human tragedy, doesn't it? Wonderful post!

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  17. A powerful post. I remember learning about this in school and always found it interesting.
    Sunny :)

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  18. I'm pretty sure that6 Pompeii, in AD 79, was one of the first thing I ever learned in world history in 4th grade. It continues to fascinate; thanks.

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  19. I've always been fascinated by Pompeii. Great post!

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  20. I do not know they are still thinking of new method to reveal and preserve these figures. It is sad and amazing. Thanks for sharing.

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  21. Great "D" photo and choic.
    I have always been intrigued by Pompeii since t National Geographic article a long time ago.

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  22. Pompei and Herculaneum are two places I've always wanted to visit, but I don't suppose I'll ever manage it now. Fine post.

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Any weighty (and not so weighty) comments are welcome!